I was super excited when I found this recipe, but what about the eggs? Will it work without? Well, I’ve been making waffles for a bit now, and I didn’t want to use egg replacer. So instead, I used a tablespoon of cornstarch to thicken up the batter a bit. They turned out great. I also toned down the liquid a bit since I find it easier to work with a stiffer dough, but you can probably work it just fine with the called amounts. When you let the mixture sit for a bit, the baking powder starts to work and it gets fluffy and airy. Pretty cool.

Pumpkin Nut Waffles
pg 31 The Laura Secord Canadian Cookbook

From the Indians we learned to value the native-grown pumpkin and added it to familiar foods or created new ones.  Cinnamon and nutmeg enhance the pumpkin flavour of these waffles which should be served with a generous dab of golden butter (or not) and lots of Canadian maple syrup.

Preheat waffle iron. If necessary grease with unsalted fat. (I spray mine with canola oil in between each batch of waffles)

Sift or blend together:
2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

Beat with a rotary beater:
3 egg yolks (1 tablespoon cornstarch)
1 3/4 cups milk (1 1/2 cups almond milk)
1/3 cup vegetable oil

Blen in:
1/2 cup canned pumpkin

Stir in dry ingredients, beating until almost smooth.

Beat until stiff and fold in:
3 egg whites (totally omitted this step)

Pour batter onto preheated waffle iron using 1/12 cups batter for each 9-inch square waffle (I use an ice cream scoop, one per side on my George Foreman, they don’t reach the edges, but I don’t get any messy spills either).

Sprinkle with:
chopped pecans or walnuts (I didn’t notice until now you were supposed to bake the nuts IN them, I didn’t want the nuts anyway, so that’s the husband’s portion up top)

Bake until waffle iron stops steaming. Serve hot, with butter (margarine) and Canadian maple syrup.

Makes 8 to 10 waffles (I got 12 smaller ones)